Tag Archives: poaching

Biodiversity challenge – Sulawesi babirusa

Just because my teeth are curly
Sulawesi babirusa by Becky Richardson Senisse

Sulawesi babirusa by Becky Richardson Senisse

Curious creatures,
Ferocious features:
The two tusketeers,
Part pig, part deer.
Long in the tooth,
Last flush of youth.
Canine-clad rivals,
The early arrivals,
Eager for kicks
And a sodium fix.
First the refuelling,
Then ritual duelling.

babirusa_virginia_potter

Sulawesi babirusa, Oil on panel by Virginia Potter

Porcine posing,
It won’t be pretty;
Curly burly
In salt lick city.
Two legs good
For a stand-up fight;
Boxing babirusas,
A wondrous sight.
Hot rock hog trot,
Once round the wallow.
Swine lake ballet,
Hard to swallow.

You’re not going crazy,
Pigs dance in Sulawesi.

© Tim Knight and timknightwriter,
2014

Species profile: Sulawesi babirusa

IUCN Red List Category: Vulnerable

This remarkable pig is confined to undisturbed rainforest on Sulawesi, Indonesia’s fourth largest island. Babirusa literally means ‘pig deer’. The curly tusks sported by the males are the upper canine teeth, which grow upwards out of the snout. One of the babirusa’s last remaining strongholds is the Nantu Wildllife Sanctuary, which has a natural salt lick where these social pigs often gather to chew the sodium-rich volcanic rock and drink from the hot springs. The males fight by rearing up on their hind legs and ‘dancing’. The babirusa and its rainforest habitat are under severe threat. Forest clearance and illegal poaching for meat have reduced the population to an estimated 5,000 individuals. Logging activity is opening up areas previously inaccessible to hunters, increasing the pressure on this charismatic species.

Biodiversity challenge – Cat Ba langur

Bay window of opportunity

Cat Ba langur by Dao Van Hoang https://www.behance.net/daovanhoang

Fewer than five dozen
Not-so-distant cousins.
Fifty-nine steps
Down to
Golden silence.
No relief
From loggers, poachers,
Habitat encroachers.
How to keep them all at bay?
No way.
Beyond belief
To turn a primate into paste;
It boils down to a tragic waste.
They won’t be
Safe from harm
Until the long arm
Of the monkey balm brigade
Is cut off in its prime.
So where’s the punishment
To fit the crime?
Running out of time
To stop the hunters
And their punters.
How long left
Before Ha Long’s bereft?
Can Cat Ba’s
Langur
Linger
Longer?

© Tim Knight and timknightwriter, 2014

Species profile: Cat Ba langur

IUCN Red List Category: Critically Endangered

The Cat Ba or golden-headed langur is one of the world’s most endangered primates, confined to a single island in Vietnam’s Ha Long Bay. This spectacular leaf-eating monkey has almost been wiped out by a combination of poaching and destruction or degradation of its forest habitat. It is hunted not for its meat, which is considered unappetising, but for use in traditional medicine, where its body is boiled down and turned into cao khi (monkey balm), which is claimed to have soothing properties. The population had crashed from several thousand to just 53 individuals before the Cat Ba Langur Conservation Project began in 2000. Since then, poaching has been almost non-existent and numbers have increased to an estimated 59, but low reproductive rates and the dangers of inbreeding mean that the future of the species remains in the balance.

Biodiversity challenge – Lear’s macaw

Parrot passion 

Houston, we have a situation:
The last surviving Lear’s macaws
Heading for extermination,
Adjacent to the exit doors.
A one-way ticket – Destination
Calamity – clasped in their claws.
Hunted close to extirpation,
Permanently in the wars;
Pet trade and deforestation
Probably the final straws.

Cue renewed determination
To pluck them from extinction’s jaws;
Cue increased collaboration,
Nations rally to the cause;
Cue more stringent legislation,
Tighter anti-poaching laws;
Cue licuri propagation,
Makeshift palm nut superstores;
Cue a cause for celebration:
Parrot population soars.
Cue collective wild elation,
Hear the thunderous applause.
Victory for conservation,
Harbingers of doom, up yours.

© Tim Knight and timknightwriter, 2014.